Marionettes on video screen

‘Deepfakes’: A New Challenge for Trial Courts

The following was excerpted from an article that will appear in a future issue of NWLawyer. The author was also recently interviewed for the “What’s Next” newsletter on LAW.COM, which you can read here. The client shows his lawyer a video he says he took on his cell phone. It shows the defendant saying things […]

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Cover of NWLawyer

The Evolution of Tribal Law and the Janus Effect inside NWLawyer

The Supreme Court decision of Janus v. American Federation of State, County, and Municipal Employees, Council 311 is reverberating through state bars across the country. Along with the Washington Supreme Court’s “comprehensive review of the structure of the bar,” it’s easy for Washington legal professionals to wonder: How will this affect me and my work? […]

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April-May NWLawyer cover

When an Arm is a Gun, and More, in the April/May NWLawyer

What’s in a name? If it’s in a courtroom setting, everything. What’s in a name? If it’s in a courtroom setting, everything. In the April-May issue of NWLawyer, we look at the pivotal nuances involved in courtroom language interpretation and the three critical steps attorneys can take to make sure nothing is lost in translation.

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Cover of March NWLawyer

Spring into the latest issue of NWLawyer!

In the March NWLawyer we take a close look at some of the practical and legal barriers to reporting sexual misconduct in the workplace. In the March issue of NWLawyer, we take a close look at some of the practical and legal barriers to reporting sexual misconduct in the workplace. We also get a fascinating […]

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Supreme Court Approves RPC Amendments on Imputed Conflicts

The Supreme Court recently approved Rules of Professional Conduct amendments addressing imputed conflicts for public defenders. The Washington Supreme Court recently approved a package of related Rules of Professional Conduct (RPC) amendments addressing imputed conflicts for public defenders. “Imputed” conflicts are those shared by all law practitioners working in a single firm. Some public defenders […]

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Cover of NWLawyer September 2017

It’s Here: The September Issue of NWLawyer

Inside the latest issue of NWLawyer, you’ll find: cross-examination tips from one of the state’s leading trial lawyers; an in-depth look at the use of police body-worn cameras in Washington; and an exploration of mandatory malpractice insurance. You can also take our 11-question quiz to test your knowledge on gender barriers. See how much you […]

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Cover of March NWLawyer

Hot Off the Press (and Web): the Latest Issue of NWLawyer

In the March issue of NWLawyer, we hear from WSBA members on their views on President Trump’s executive orders on immigration, including: an in-depth legal analysis of the orders, perspective from an Iranian-American attorney, and a story about an innovative solution that employs technology to assist immigrants and refugees in need of representation.

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Washington Capitol

State Legislature Gavels in a New Session with Focus on Funding

State lawmakers began their 2017 session with a flurry of activity, with budgetary issues a main priority for legislators, who are under pressure to come up with a plan for funding basic education. Fiscal committees held hearings on Democratic Gov. Jay Inslee’s proposed 2017-2019 budget. Policy committees opened hearings on statewide civil legal aid services, […]

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Washington Capitol

And They’re Off! State Legislature Begins Heavy Session

The 2017 regular legislative session is now underway in Olympia. Lawmakers have significant issues to tackle this year, including closing a budget deficit upwards of $5 billion that encompasses fully funding basic education under the McCleary decision, mental health obligations, and other emergent public policy needs.

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Cartoon of man with mouth full of bricks

Supreme Court Holds No Privilege for Communications with Former Employees

In a case of first impression in Washington, the state Supreme Court recently held that communications between corporate or governmental counsel and former employees do not fall within the attorney-client privilege even if the communications concern matters that occurred during a former employee’s work for the corporation or government agency involved. The Supreme Court’s 5–4 […]

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