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Dentist treats a young girl in cowgirl boots

New Law Opens Dental Practice Ownership to Those Not Licensed to Practice

Dental support organizations are typically not owned by dentists, so historically they use creative methods to operate in Washington. Until recently, state law required any entity providing dental services to be owned and controlled by licensed dentists. A new law opens that door, while placing clear restrictions and patient protections.
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Cover of NWLawyer September 2017

It’s Here: The September Issue of NWLawyer

 

Inside the latest issue of NWLawyer, you’ll find: cross-examination tips from one of the state’s leading trial lawyers; an in-depth look at the use of police body-worn cameras in Washington; and an exploration of mandatory malpractice insurance.
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Two Social Security Cards

Navigating Inherent Bias in Social Security Law

In a perfect world, there’d be less need for the safety nets of Social Security, and no one who warranted disability would be denied because of administrative or subjective biases. This world isn’t perfect, though, and biases exist to the point where a whole industry has been formed to get unduly denied and disabled Americans the support they have been and are guaranteed by Congress and the law.
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Foundation logo

What is the Washington State Bar Foundation?

That’s a question I get asked a lot, and I’m sure it’s one you’ve asked yourself. Let me start by explaining what it is not. It is not to be confused with the Legal Foundation of Washington (LFW), which raises and distributes state, private, and IOLTA funds to support civil legal aid across the state. The Washington State Bar Foundation is also not the Washington State Bar Association (WSBA), which both regulates lawyers and provides professional-association like services to its members. So what is the Washington State Bar Foundation? The Foundation is the fundraising arm for the WSBA’s public service and diversity programs. Separately incorporated as a Washington state nonprofit, the Foundation is recognized as a public charity under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code.
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Recent Articles

1
Sep

Help Law Students Shop Without Spending a Dime

A mannequin in a pop up shop
If you’re a law student, how do you dress for the job you want on the budget you currently have?

A mannequin in a pop up shopIf you’re a law student, how do you dress for the job you want on the budget you currently have?

I’ve worked in Seattle University School of Law’s Center for Professional Development (CPD) since 2008, and during that time I’ve encouraged students to “dress for success” and “be the best dressed person in the room” and, yes, “dress for the jobs they want.” But what do these platitudes mean when confronted with a tight student budget? Suits are expensive and getting properly fitted and styled sometimes comes with additional costs. Read more »

28
Aug

Court of Appeals Rules on Authority of Insurance Defense Counsel

A client and attorney
Appeals court addresses an insurance defense counsel’s authority when the counsel had no contact with the insured throughout litigation.

A client and attorneyDivision II of the Court of Appeals recently addressed the authority of insurance defense counsel in an unusual scenario: where defense counsel had no contact with the insured throughout the course of the litigation involved. Kruger-Willis v. Hoffenburg, 198 Wn. App. 408, 393 P.3d 844 (2017), arose out of an automobile accident. The defendant drove a truck into the plaintiff’s parked car. The defendant’s insurer paid for the property damage involved, but then the plaintiff sued the defendant for the diminished value of the vehicle. The defendant prevailed at trial, and the trial court awarded the defendant $11,490 in fees and costs. In the course of litigating the fee award, defense counsel admitted that he had never had any contact with the defendant. Read more »

23
Aug

Is “Diverse” Really What You Mean?

diversity and tolerance on multicolor background
Language matters—I mean really, really matters. The words we choose can make a huge difference to the overall meaning of something we are communicating.

diversity and tolerance on multicolor backgroundLanguage matters—I mean really, really matters. The words we choose can make a huge difference to the overall meaning of something we are communicating. Even little connotations and implications can have a big impact on the meaning. For example, if I were to write the sentences, “His actions were youthful,” and, “His actions were childish,” you would see that the last words in each sentence have the same definition (denotative meaning) but very different implications (connotative meaning). Denotatively they both mean seeming young or having qualities associated with a child, but connotatively, the former suggests spry and lively (positive connotations) while the latter suggests naiveté or immaturity (negative connotations). Read more »

21
Aug

TAP Scholarship Recipient Recalls 5 Moments of Insight

A female lawyer in trial
Are you a new or young lawyer who would like to participate in this year’s Trial Advocacy Program? Apply for the New Lawyer Programs Scholarship by Friday, Sept. 15, 2017.

Are you a new or young lawyer who would like to participate in this year’s Trial Advocacy Program (TAP)? Apply for the New Lawyer Programs Scholarship by Friday, Sept. 15, 2017.

If you haven’t heard of WSBA’s Trial Advocacy Program, it’s a two-day intensive trial-skills training seminar led by local trial attorneys. It culminates in an all-day mock trial before a sitting judge. It’s a great opportunity for anyone who wants to be a trial attorney. I had the fortune to attend TAP last year as a scholarship recipient and was asked to share a few “aha moments” that resonated with me. Read more »

18
Aug

Responding to Negative Online Reviews

Citations crash course
Along with marketing their practice and maintaining their digital presence, attorneys may find themselves facing a negative internet review.

Citations crash courseThe internet and social media are a part of most attorneys’ practices, whether they’ve chosen an aggressive online presence or not. Along with marketing their practice and maintaining their digital presence, attorneys may find themselves facing a negative internet review. Sometimes they call the WSBA Ethics Line (800-945-9722 ext. 8284) asking for guidance on whether and how they can respond. Can attorneys post comments themselves after receiving unfair negative reviews? We’ll do a quick review of this scenario, but be sure to read the rules and their comments in their entirety.

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