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Posts from the ‘Tort Law’ Category

6
Sep

Seven Tips for Preparing Associates for Trial

Two lawyer in a sidebar with a judge
Here are seven tips to help junior associates become effective trial attorneys.

Two lawyer in a sidebar with a judge
A trial is challenging, exhilarating and exhausting. It can also be an excellent opportunity for a junior associate to learn an incredible amount and gain significant experience in a relatively short period of time. With relentless preparation and with active mentorship, a new associate can maximize his or her early trial opportunities and can be a valuable member of a trial team. Here are seven tips for associates to consider as they develop into effective trial attorneys. Read more »

23
Jun

Court of Appeals Addresses Insurance Defense Conflicts in Reservation of Rights Context

Abstract depiction of a scale and gavel
A recent court ruling may be useful for lawyers defending an insured when they and their carrier are engaged in a separate coverage dispute.

Abstract depiction of a scale and gavelDivision II of the Court of Appeals recently addressed conflicts when an insurance defense counsel is representing an insured in a reservation of rights case. The plaintiffs in Arden v. Forsberg & Umlauf, P.S., ___ Wn. App. ___, ___ P.3d ___, 2016 WL 2647685 (May 3, 2016), asserted that the defendant law firm had a conflict when representing them in an earlier tort case and were pursuing breach of fiduciary duty and related claims against the firm. On summary judgment, the firm argued that it had no conflict. The trial court agreed and dismissed the case. The Court of Appeals affirmed. Read more »

20
May

Court of Appeals Discusses Interplay Between RPC 1.16 and CR 71 on Withdrawal

A lawyer walking out of court
At issue: Strategy conflicts in a commercial lease and mold-exposure case leading to claims of legal malpractice.

A lawyer walking out of courtDivision III of the Court of Appeals recently addressed the interplay between RPC 1.16 and CR 71 on withdrawal in Schibel v. Eymann, ___ Wn. App. ___, ___ P.3d ___, 2016 WL 1639567 (Apr. 26, 2016). Schibel is a legal malpractice case that grew out of commercial lease and related mold exposure litigation. Disagreements over strategy in the underlying case led the lawyers to seek leave to withdraw. Because the trial was approaching rapidly, the lawyers also filed a motion to continue. The trial court allowed the withdrawal but denied the continuance. When the clients — who were then pro se — did not appear for trial, the trial court dismissed their claims with prejudice and the Court of Appeals affirmed in Schibel v. Johnson, 2012 WL 2326992 (Wn. App. June 19, 2012) (unpublished). Read more »

9
Feb

Sorry, Adele – Trump Doesn’t Need Your Permission to Play Your Songs

Donald Trump and Adele
Trump recently got an earful from Adele after playing her song at his rally. Amazingly, Trump didn’t apologize. Turns out he didn’t need to.

Donald Trump and AdeleIn almost every election cycle, musical artists are surprised to find their songs being played without their permission at campaign events hosted by politicians that they don’t support, and seek recourse to copyright law in order to prevent further performances. And, in almost every election cycle, they are, as a legal matter, usually dead wrong. Read more »

14
Dec

Eastern District Addresses Lateral-Hire Screening to Avoid Disqualification

 

new lawyer education business startup
Mark Fucile explains how early screening helps avoid disqualification by conflicts arising from lateral hires in law firms.

new lawyer education business startupThe federal district court in Spokane recently addressed lateral-hire screening to avoid disqualification in Assenberg v. County of Whitman, No. 2:14-CV-0145-TOR, 2015 WL 5178032 (E.D. Wash. Sept. 4, 2015) (unpublished). While the court rejected disqualification in this case, the ruling underscores the importance of early and thorough screening when law firms take on new lateral hires. Read more »