Screen shot from WSBA's first website

Blast from the Past: When the WSBA First Went Online 25 Years Ago

In 1996, “Macarena” was topping the charts, Japanese consumers became the first to purchase a new video format called DVDs, Independence Day blew up both U.S. landmarks and box offices, and the WSBA officially entered cyberspace. Recently, a member of the WSBA Communications Department was searching through old issues of Washington State Bar News and happened upon the following article which details the WSBA’s first website that went live 25 years ago this year.

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Thief steals a purse while witness does nothing.

Are Bystanders Complicit? The Holocaust as Foundation for Crimes of Omission

If you are a bystander and witness a crime, should it be a legal obligation for you to intervene? Or is moral responsibility enough? I have come to view the bystander, who fails to act, as complicit in harm that befalls the victim. This has compelled me to create a workable legal requirement whereby duty can be imposed on the bystander. Relying on the oft-repeated phrase that “people will do the right thing” is appealing and compelling, but the moral obligation model is, for me, tenuous and soft.

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Island County Courthouse

Ghost of Courts Past: The Story behind Washington’s Oldest Courthouse

In the July/August issue of NWLawyer (now Bar News), Andrew Bergh pointed out in his excellent article, “Washington’s Historic Courthouses—Through the Lens: Attorney-Photographer Explores the State,” that the beautiful 1887 courthouse in Columbia County is the oldest working courthouse in the state. While Bergh gave a fascinating glimpse of Washington’s legal history, there is actually much more to the story of Washington’s true oldest courthouse.

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Closeup of Vote by Mail envelope

A Brief Legal History of Washington’s Vote-By-Mail System

For weeks, the national discourse has been embroiled in battles over the U.S. Postal Service (USPS) and the upcoming general election. Amidst an ongoing health calamity, people in the U.S. and around the world question how America will pull off a national election not so much from the ballot box but from the mailbox. A Brief Legal History of Washington’s Vote-By-Mail System.

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Ruth Bader Ginsburg

I Dissent: The Legacy of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Perhaps the most impactful of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s famous dissents came in a case about gender pay inequity in the workplace: Ledbetter v. Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co., 550 U.S. 618 (2007). Plaintiff Lilly Ledbetter began working as a supervisor at the Goodyear Tire plant in Gadsen, Alabama, in 1979. She worked there for 19 years and for most of that time was the only woman manager.

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The first amendment on display in front of Independence Hall in Philadelphia.

‘Make No Law’ Undergirds the Rule of Law

On May 1 — Law Day 2019 — we honor a constitutional provision that says “make no law,” as we commemorate the rule of law in the United States. “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; […]

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lady justice

2017 Law Day Celebrates the 14th Amendment

May 1 is Law Day and this year’s theme is The 14th Amendment: Transforming American Democracy. The American Bar Association (ABA) notes that the theme “provides the opportunity to explore the many ways that the Fourteenth Amendment has reshaped American law and society.” Viewed as the “cornerstone” of landmark civil rights legislation, the 14th Amendment […]

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Victoria Woodhull, Belva Ann Lockwood, Shirley Chisholm, Lenora Fulani, and Jill Stein

Friday 5: Women Who Ran for President

Hillary Clinton made history this election season, but she is far from the first female candidate. Hillary Clinton made history this election season by being the first woman nominated for president by a major political party. But she is far from the first female candidate — women have been running for president since the late […]

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